#occupywallstreet

bankruptingamerica:

Today was the Occupy Wall Street West day of action against the disastrous Citizens United Supreme Court decision that gave corporations the same free speech rights as people. (Jan 21 is the decision’s 2-year anniversary.) Rainforest Action Network and The Alliance of Californians for Community Empowerment joined with Occupy Wall St. West to conduct a “man” hunt for Mr. Bank O. America, a corporate “person” who is considered an extreme menace to society.

Via Understory:

Wanted: Mr. Bank O. America, Menace To Society

This morning, we conducted a manhunt in San Francisco. Or, I should say, a “man” hunt.

If corporations are people, then this Mr. Bank O. America fellow is a clear and present danger to society, and he must be brought to justice. So we teamed up with The Alliance of Californians for Community Empowerment, rounded up a posse, and searched the streets of San Francisco for this fugitive from justice.

We went to several of his known hangouts (otherwise known as Bank of America branches) with a citizen’s arrest warrant in hand. But the perp had flown the coop before we got to each location.

Just to make sure Mr. Bank O. America’s crime spree is brought to an end as soon as possible, we pasted the arrest warrant all over town. If he exists — which I’m beginning to doubt — we’ll catch him.

Just what are Mr. Bank O. America’s crimes? It’s a long list. He’s a tax cheat who made off with BILLIONS in taxpayer dollars, even while he was putting thousands of Americans out of work by helping crash our economy. He’s a notorious bankroller of the dirtiest energy source — coal — and is thus responsible for poisoning countless communities across the States. And he has outright stolen more of America’s homes than any other bank-person-thing (sorry, the metaphor kinda broke down there — see how ridiculous the idea of corporate personhood is?).

bankruptingamerica:

Via Understory:

Bank of America ATMs In San Francisco Turned Into Truth Machines
RAN activists took to the streets of San Francisco last night and turned every Bank of America ATM in the city into an Automated Truth Machine. The activists used special non-adhesive stickers designed to look exactly like BoA’s ATM interface. But instead of checking and savings accounts, these new menus offered a list of everything BoA customers’ money is being used for, including investment in coal-fired power plants, foreclosure on Americans’ homes, bankrolling of climate change, and paying for fat executive bonuses. Go here to see a handy map showing all 85 ATMs we made a little more truthful last night. The stickers also encourage BoA customers to “Stop doing business with Bank of America until they start behaving responsibly” and have the URL to this here blog (BankruptingAmerica.tumblr.com), which RAN launched along with New Bottom Line. We’re using Bankrupting America to track all the ways BoA is bankrupting America, hence the name. We’ve received so many submissions it’s clear to us that this website was badly needed. There are lots of grievances to be aired with regard to how Bank of America is conducting its business these days, as it turns out. (Not that that’s terribly surprising.) Feel free to submit if you’re so inclined.

bankruptingamerica:

Via Understory:

Bank of America ATMs In San Francisco Turned Into Truth Machines

RAN activists took to the streets of San Francisco last night and turned every Bank of America ATM in the city into an Automated Truth Machine.

The activists used special non-adhesive stickers designed to look exactly like BoA’s ATM interface. But instead of checking and savings accounts, these new menus offered a list of everything BoA customers’ money is being used for, including investment in coal-fired power plants, foreclosure on Americans’ homes, bankrolling of climate change, and paying for fat executive bonuses.

Go here to see a handy map showing all 85 ATMs we made a little more truthful last night.

The stickers also encourage BoA customers to “Stop doing business with Bank of America until they start behaving responsibly” and have the URL to this here blog (BankruptingAmerica.tumblr.com), which RAN launched along with New Bottom Line.

We’re using Bankrupting America to track all the ways BoA is bankrupting America, hence the name. We’ve received so many submissions it’s clear to us that this website was badly needed. There are lots of grievances to be aired with regard to how Bank of America is conducting its business these days, as it turns out. (Not that that’s terribly surprising.)

Feel free to submit if you’re so inclined.
Occupy Wall Street: Good for the Environment?
Zuccotti Park in Lower Manhattan — the site of the Occupy Wall  Street protests for the past month — is a pretty desolate place to camp  out: it’s fenced in by glass towers, paved with granite slabs, and  landscaped with a few spindly honey locust trees. There’s no grass or  fresh water, not even a drinking fountain, though there is a tiny flower  garden that the protesters do their best not to trample. The park  itself is only 33,000 square feet, little more than half the size of a  football field. Tourists gather at a safe distance around the park’s  border and snap photos of the 5,000-some-odd protesters as they sprawl,  stretch, pace, paint signs, bang on things, drink bottled water, and,  occasionally, roar. It feels at times less like an acampada than a zoo.
But don’t let that fool you — this arguably is the most technologically sophisticated protest in history. Twitter-born, optics-aware, and social-media savvy, the Occupy Wall Street  activists have managed to capture the nation’s attention and spawn  copycat protests around the world. And so it was both fitting and  charmingly absurd on Saturday afternoon when author and climate activist  Bill McKibben — staging a “teach-in” on climate change at Washington  Square Park before the Occupy Wall Street general assembly — had to  resort to the most analog form of amplification imaginable: the “human  megaphone,” whereby members of the crowd repeat after him, like members  of a gospel choir, to transmit each phrase of his speech to those out of  earshot. (Police had prohibited the use of megaphones.)
"The reason it’s so great…" McKibben said, his long thin arm chopping at the air like a scythe.
"The reason it’s so great…" the crowd echoed.
"That we’re occupying Wall Street…"
"That we’re occupying Wall Street…"
"Is that Wall Street…"
"Is that Wall Street…"
"Has been occupying the atmosphere!"
"Has been occupying the atmosphere!"
"The sky does not belong to Exxon," McKibben continued. "They cannot keep using it as a sewer into which to dump their carbon."

Occupy Wall Street: Good for the Environment?

Zuccotti Park in Lower Manhattan — the site of the Occupy Wall Street protests for the past month — is a pretty desolate place to camp out: it’s fenced in by glass towers, paved with granite slabs, and landscaped with a few spindly honey locust trees. There’s no grass or fresh water, not even a drinking fountain, though there is a tiny flower garden that the protesters do their best not to trample. The park itself is only 33,000 square feet, little more than half the size of a football field. Tourists gather at a safe distance around the park’s border and snap photos of the 5,000-some-odd protesters as they sprawl, stretch, pace, paint signs, bang on things, drink bottled water, and, occasionally, roar. It feels at times less like an acampada than a zoo.

But don’t let that fool you — this arguably is the most technologically sophisticated protest in history. Twitter-born, optics-aware, and social-media savvy, the Occupy Wall Street activists have managed to capture the nation’s attention and spawn copycat protests around the world. And so it was both fitting and charmingly absurd on Saturday afternoon when author and climate activist Bill McKibben — staging a “teach-in” on climate change at Washington Square Park before the Occupy Wall Street general assembly — had to resort to the most analog form of amplification imaginable: the “human megaphone,” whereby members of the crowd repeat after him, like members of a gospel choir, to transmit each phrase of his speech to those out of earshot. (Police had prohibited the use of megaphones.)

"The reason it’s so great…" McKibben said, his long thin arm chopping at the air like a scythe.

"The reason it’s so great…" the crowd echoed.

"That we’re occupying Wall Street…"

"That we’re occupying Wall Street…"

"Is that Wall Street…"

"Is that Wall Street…"

"Has been occupying the atmosphere!"

"Has been occupying the atmosphere!"

"The sky does not belong to Exxon," McKibben continued. "They cannot keep using it as a sewer into which to dump their carbon."