#occupywallstreet
paulcurrier:

From June 30th to July 4th, 2012, Occupy movement activists and supporters will gather in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania for the first Occupy National Gathering. This event is the culmination of months of organizing and consensus-building by countless activists from across the country. It has been endorsed by Occupy General Assemblies from Wall Street to Sacramento, and Austin to Kalamazoo, providing a clear example of the movement’s disparate chapters collaborating on a massive scale.
Occupy Philadelphia and the National Gathering Working Group, which initially proposed the event, invite all people to gather on Independence Mall for five days of community and movement building culminating in a massive outdoor gathering on July 4th. The main goals of the event are to strengthen our internal bonds, join together in direct actions, and engage in a transparent democratic process reflecting the values of the movement.
Activities will include:Four days of discussions, teach-ins, political theater, and community bonding.Protests and direct actions with Occupiers from across the movement.Collectively crafting a Vision for a Democratic Future on July 4th.
All people of good conscience who are fed up and ready to stand up for economic and social justice are invited to join us at Independence Mall. We will send the message that injustice of any kind is unacceptable. No government or corporation can ignore the will of the people any longer. We can build a better world together. 
Those in Solidarity so far…
IndyOWS – Indianapolis, IN
Occupy Albany – Albany, NY
Occupy Asheville – Asheville, NC
Occupy Astoria – New York, NY
Occupy Austin – Austin, TX
Occupy Baltimore – Baltimore, MD
Occupy Baton Rouge – Baton Rouge, LA
Occupy Birmingham – Birmingham, AL
Occupy Bozeman – Bozeman, MT
Occupy Buswick – Buswick, NY
Occupy Carson City – Carson City, NV
Occupy Charleston – Charleston, SC
Occupy Chattanooga – Chattanooga, TN
Occupy Davis – Davis, CA
Occupy DC – Washington, DC
Occupy Delaware – Wilmington, DE
Occupy Elmira – Corning, NY
Occupy Erie – Erie, PA
Occupy Fort Collins – Fort Collins, CO
Occupy Harrisburg – Harrisburg, PA
Occupy Harrisonburg – Harrisonburg, VA
Occupy Hartford – Hartford, CN
Occupy Jacksonville – Jacksonville, FL
Occupy Jersey City – Jersey City, NJ
Occupy Kalamazoo – Kalamazoo, MI
Occupy Kansas City – Kansas City, MO
Occupy Lancaster – Lancaster, PA
Occupy Las Vegas – Las Vegas, NV
Occupy Littleton – Littleton, CO
Occupy Maine – Portland, ME
Occupy Merced CA – Merced, CA
Occupy New Orleans – New Orleans, LA
Occupy Philadelphia – Philadelphia, PA
Occupy Pikes Peak – Pikes Peak, CO
Occupy Queens – Queens, NY
Occupy Sacramento – Sacramento, CA
Occupy Salt Lake City – Salt Lake City, UT
Occupy San Antonio – San Antonio, TX
Occupy Springfield – Springfield, MO
Occupy Staten Island – Staten Island, NY
Occupy Trenton – Trenton, NJ
Occupy Tulsa – Tulsa, OK
Occupy Wall Street – New York, NY
Occupy Worcester – Worcester, MA

paulcurrier:

From June 30th to July 4th, 2012, Occupy movement activists and supporters will gather in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania for the first Occupy National Gathering. This event is the culmination of months of organizing and consensus-building by countless activists from across the country. It has been endorsed by Occupy General Assemblies from Wall Street to Sacramento, and Austin to Kalamazoo, providing a clear example of the movement’s disparate chapters collaborating on a massive scale.

Occupy Philadelphia and the National Gathering Working Group, which initially proposed the event, invite all people to gather on Independence Mall for five days of community and movement building culminating in a massive outdoor gathering on July 4th. The main goals of the event are to strengthen our internal bonds, join together in direct actions, and engage in a transparent democratic process reflecting the values of the movement.

Activities will include:
Four days of discussions, teach-ins, political theater, and community bonding.
Protests and direct actions with Occupiers from across the movement.
Collectively crafting a Vision for a Democratic Future on July 4th.

All people of good conscience who are fed up and ready to stand up for economic and social justice are invited to join us at Independence Mall. We will send the message that injustice of any kind is unacceptable. No government or corporation can ignore the will of the people any longer. We can build a better world together.

 

Those in Solidarity so far…

The Saving American Democracy Amendment states that:

  • Corporations are not persons with constitutional rights equal to real people.
  • Corporations are subject to regulation by the people. 
  • Corporations may not make campaign contributions or any election expenditures. 
  • Congress and states have the power to regulate campaign finances.

155,272 signatures so far.

occupyonline:

1. It names the source of the crisis.
Political insiders have avoided this simple reality: The problems of the 99% are caused in large part by Wall Street greed, perverse financial incentives, and a corporate takeover of the political system. Now that this is understood, the genie is out of the bottle and it can’t be put back in.

2. It provides a clear vision of the world we want.
We can create a world that works for everyone, not just the wealthiest 1%. And we, the 99%, are using the spaces opened up by the Occupy movement to conduct a dialogue about the world we want.

3. It sets a new standard for public debate.
Those advocating policies and proposals must now demonstrate that their ideas will benefit the 99%. Serving only the 1% will not suffice, nor will claims that the subsidies and policies that benefit the 1% will eventually “trickle down.”

4. It presents a new narrative.
The solution is not to starve government or impose harsh austerity measures that further harm middle-class and poor people already reeling from a bad economy. Instead, the solution is to free society and government from corporate dominance. A functioning democracy is our best shot at addressing critical social, environmental, and economic crises.

5. It creates a big tent.
We, the 99%, are people of all ages, races, occupations, and political beliefs. We will resist being divided or marginalized. We are learning to work together with respect.

6. It offers everyone a chance to create change.
No one is in charge; no organization or political party calls the shots. Anyone can get involved, offer proposals, support the occupations, and build the movement. Because leadership is everywhere and new supporters keep turning up, there is a flowering of creativity and a resilience that makes the movement nearly impossible to shut down.

7. It is a movement, not a list of demands.
The call for deep change—not temporary fixes and single-issue reforms—is the movement’s sustaining power. The movement is sometimes criticized for failing to issue a list of demands, but doing so could keep it tied to status quo power relationships and policy options. The occupiers and their supporters will not be boxed in.

8. It combines the local and the global.
People in cities and towns around the world are setting their own local agendas, tactics, and aims. What they share in common is a critique of corporate power and an identification with the 99%, creating an extraordinary wave of global solidarity.

9. It offers an ethic and practice of deep democracy and community.
Slow, patient decision-making in which every voice is heard translates into wisdom, common commitment, and power. Occupy sites are set up as communities in which anyone can discuss grievances, hopes, and dreams, and where all can experiment with living in a space built around mutual support.

10. We have reclaimed our power.
Instead of looking to politicians and leaders to bring about change, we can see now that the power rests with us. Instead of being victims to the forces upending our lives, we are claiming our sovereign right to remake the world.

intricateandsubtle:

An occupation of Philadelphia’s City Hall to take a stand against corporate greed and corruption in politics, as well as the fact that the wealthiest 1% dominates our country and has stolen our democracy. THIS is what democracy looks like - and it will NEVER be silenced.  I am the 99% - and you are too. In Philly? Come join us at City Hall (Broad and Market)!

intricateandsubtle:

An occupation of Philadelphia’s City Hall to take a stand against corporate greed and corruption in politics, as well as the fact that the wealthiest 1% dominates our country and has stolen our democracy. THIS is what democracy looks like - and it will NEVER be silenced.

I am the 99% - and you are too. 
In Philly? Come join us at City Hall (Broad and Market)!

domestic-terrorism:

From the march and altercation on the Brooklyn Bridge, Saturday.

domestic-terrorism:

From the march and altercation on the Brooklyn Bridge, Saturday.

We’re talking about a democratic awakening. We’re talking about raising political consciousness, so it spills over; all parts of the country so people can begin to see what’s going on through a different set of lens. And then you begin to highlight what the more detailed demands would be, because in the end we’re really talking about what Martin King would call a revolution; a transfer of power from oligarchs to every day people of all colors, and that is a step-by-step process. It’s a democratic process, it’s a non-violent process, but it is a revolution, because these oligarchs have been transferring wealth from poor and working people at a very intense rate in the last 30 years, and getting away with it, and then still smiling in our faces and telling us it’s our fault. That’s a lie, and this beautiful group is a testimony to that being a lie.

When you get the makings of a U.S. autumn responding to the Arab Spring, and is growing and growing—-I hope it spills over to San Francisco and Chicago and Miami and Phoenix, Arizona, with our brown brothers and sisters, hits our poor white brothers and sisters in Appalachia—-so. it begins to coalesce. And I tell you, it is sublime to see all the different colors, all the different genders, all the different sexual orientations and different cultures, all together here in Liberty Plaza; there’s no doubt about it.

Cornel West, interview. Democracy Now!, 29 September 2011

A good response to people who keep demanding that the OWS protestors draw up some sort of platform of demands. That rarely happens in the early stages of liberation movements. At the moment, it’s about raising the consciousness of everyday Americans who have thus far accepted the notion that the U.S. is a democratic, fair, and equal society. It may be a strange notion to most Americans, but our country is one that—like the countries involved in the Arab Spring—is crying out for a democratic revolution.

(via downlo)

Posted 2011-09-26 08:03:45 UTC by OccupyWallSt

This is the ninth communiqué from the 99 percent. We are occupying Wall Street. The police barricades that have been surrounding the Stock Exchange help.

Sunday has been decreed, once again, a day of rest. We didn’t march. We have made a new world, a new city within the city. We are working on a new sky for where the towers are now.

Throughout the day our sisters and brothers arrested yesterday came back home to Liberty Plaza. They greeted the new faces that have joined us here. They shared their stories of imprisonment, of medical care denied and delayed. We welcomed them and listened.

We had visitors

Click through for video

Immortal Technique

Reverend Billy

Yesterday was a day of action, and today was one of healing, discussion, and preparation. Working groups met in small circles around the plaza, planning their work and preparing to report back to the General Assembly as a whole. The Assembly debated, as always, the hows and whys of being here. In the morning, we talked about the occupations rising up in cities around the United States, joining us in what we’re doing, as people begin rediscovering the power in themselves against the powers looming over them in buildings. We talked of calling more people to do what we’re doing. In the evening we talked about staying, or leaving, and what this space means for us. We love it, we’re almost addicted to it, but what we are is more than this.

We strolled around the plaza. We wrote songs with new friends. We argued about politics with each other, but not a politics of puppets: a politics for us. We fed the hungry and gave sleeping bags to the cold. We roughhoused. We talked to the world on our livestream. Most of all, we kept on organizing ourselves. Our library grew.

Drums blared for hours into the night when the Assembly wasn’t in session, until the time came for quiet. The drummers ended by reciting from the Principles of Solidarity we approved in Friday’s General Assembly, in the rain. Before the police lined along the Broadway side of the plaza, they cried together, “We are daring to imagine a new socio-political and economic alternative that offers greater possibility of equality.” And more.

“Safety in numbers!” a sign by them says. “Join us.”

domestic-terrorism:

Democracy Now! covers Occupy Wall Street.

Strategically speaking, there is a very real danger that if we naively put our cards on the table and rally around the “overthrow of capitalism” or some equally outworn utopian slogan, then our Tahrir moment will quickly fizzle into another inconsequential ultra-lefty spectacle soon forgotten. But if we have the cunning to come up with a deceptively simple Trojan Horse demand … something profound, yet so specific and doable that it is impossible for President Obama to ignore … something that spotlights Wall Street’s financial capture of the US political system and confronts it with a pragmatic solution … like the reinstatement of the Glass-Steagall Act … or a 1% tax on financial transactions … or an independent investigation by the U.S. Department of Justice into the corporate corruption of our representatives in Washington … or another equally creative but downright practical demand that will emerge from the people’s assemblies held during the occupation … and if we then put our asses on the line, screw up our courage and hang in there day after day, week after week, until a large swath of Americans start rooting for us and President Obama is forced to respond … then we just might have a crack at creating a decisive moment of truth for America, a first concrete step towards achieving the radical changes we all dream about unencumbered by commitments to existing power structures.

So, let’s learn the strategic lessons of Tahrir (nonviolence), Syntagma (tenacity), Puerta del Sol (people’s assemblies) and lay aside adherence to political parties and worn-out lefty dogmas. On September 17, let’s sow the seeds of a new culture of resistance in America that fires up a permanent democratic awakening.

(Note: this is an independent blog and is not affiliated with Adbusters. Their content is re-posted for outreach purposes only.)