#occupywallstreet

Occupy Wall Street: One Year Later - Want to get caught up on the movement? Take a look at this video, highlighting last week’s actions as well as the many things we’re working on.

On Sep. 17, 2011 Occupy Wall Street started a revolution. One year later, join us for three days of education, training, and protest in New York City. http://s17nyc.org.

Authorities say dozens of Occupy Wall Street protesters were arrested as they tore down the barricades surrounding New York City’s Zuccotti Park just before midnight on New Year’s Eve.

Police say 68 people were arrested during the scuffle. At least one person was accused of assaulting a police officer, who suffered cuts on one hand. Other charges include trespassing, disorderly conduct and reckless endangerment.

Protester Jason Amadi says he was pepper-sprayed when police tried to prevent the crowd of about 500 demonstrators from taking down the barricades. Amadi says the crowd piled the barricade pieces in the center of the park and stood on top of them, chanting and singing.

carton-rouge:

Occupy Wall Street makes bid for new New York City camp

Occupy protesters played drums, cymbals and  trombones, held group  meetings and waved signs with a variety of messages — “Disobedience is   civil” and “Sorry to inconvenience your apathy” — as they marked the  movement’s third-month anniversary with a major direct action that could  give them a new home as authorities continue to shutter camps  nationwide. 
A few hundred protesters — flanked by police  officers — coalesced on a nearly half-acre plot about one mile  northwest of their former camp at Zuccotti Park. But their potential new  landlord at Duarte Square, Trinity Church, has voiced strong  opposition, and the move by Occupy is seen by some as applying strong  pressure to them to cave in and let the protesters install themselves.
Under  the banner of “Re-Occupy,” the protesters said more than 1,400 people  — elders of the civil rights movement, prominent artists, faith leaders  and community members — will help them try and set up camp there after  they were evicted from Zuccotti Park on Nov. 15.
“I’m just loving  seeing everybody from Zuccotti Park and it really puts an exclamation  point on the (question) that’s been asked today so many times, ‘Do you  guys need a space?’ … and the answer is, ‘yes.’ When you walk around  and see the familiar faces and the kindred spirits and the unification  of effort, then you realize yes we do need a space so that we can all be  together and function as whole as a group and move forward, no doubt,”  said Thorin Caristo, a 37-year-old protester who is part of an  independent livestream team.

carton-rouge:

Occupy Wall Street makes bid for new New York City camp

Occupy protesters played drums, cymbals and trombones, held group meetings and waved signs with a variety of messages — “Disobedience is civil” and “Sorry to inconvenience your apathy” — as they marked the movement’s third-month anniversary with a major direct action that could give them a new home as authorities continue to shutter camps nationwide. 

A few hundred protesters — flanked by police officers — coalesced on a nearly half-acre plot about one mile northwest of their former camp at Zuccotti Park. But their potential new landlord at Duarte Square, Trinity Church, has voiced strong opposition, and the move by Occupy is seen by some as applying strong pressure to them to cave in and let the protesters install themselves.

Under the banner of “Re-Occupy,” the protesters said more than 1,400 people — elders of the civil rights movement, prominent artists, faith leaders and community members — will help them try and set up camp there after they were evicted from Zuccotti Park on Nov. 15.

“I’m just loving seeing everybody from Zuccotti Park and it really puts an exclamation point on the (question) that’s been asked today so many times, ‘Do you guys need a space?’ … and the answer is, ‘yes.’ When you walk around and see the familiar faces and the kindred spirits and the unification of effort, then you realize yes we do need a space so that we can all be together and function as whole as a group and move forward, no doubt,” said Thorin Caristo, a 37-year-old protester who is part of an independent livestream team.

A New York judge has upheld the city’s dismantling of the Occupy Wall Street encampment, saying that the protesters’ first amendment rights don’t entitle them to camp out indefinitely in the plaza.

Supreme Court Justice Michael Stallman on Tuesday denied a motion by the demonstrators seeking to be allowed back into the park with their tents and sleeping bags.


OWS has (temporarily) taken root in a new park at 6th and Canal in lower Manhattan. It is owned by Trinity Church, with a delegation of faith leaders en route to support.

OWS has (temporarily) taken root in a new park at 6th and Canal in lower Manhattan. It is owned by Trinity Church, with a delegation of faith leaders en route to support.

…the National Lawyers Guild obtained a court order allowing Occupy Wall Street protesters to return with tents to the park. The guild said the injunction prevents the city from enforcing park rules on Occupy Wall Street protesters.

Watch #OCCUPYWALLSTREET on Livestream!

A group of occupiers have made their way to the Citibank branch at 555 Laguardia, where they attempted to close their accounts with the bank. They were promptly locked in the branch and are currently being arrested by NYPD.