#occupywallstreet

My Friends of OWS,

My message will have to be brief. But let not this brevity take from it, its strength.

You are the central movement of the hour. You’re raising questions that are in the hearts of millions. Your motto, “We are the 99%,” has been heard, heeded, and responded to by millions. You can be certain that the 1% have heard you clearest of all.

Your work, however, is just beginning. You must deepen, strengthen, and further your work until it truly reaches the 99%, almost all of us: workers, black folk, Latinos and Latinas, LGBTs, immigrants, Asians, artists, all of us, for we are integral parts of the 99%. I salute you and hope fervently that you will grow beyond number.

Though I speak to you today by proxy, I’m confident that you will hear my voice soon.

Love, fun and music,

Mumia Abu-Jamal

newleftmedia:

Occupy America  -  New Video!

New video, please help us spread the word!

Have the Occupy Wall Street protests that sprung up across the country this fall already passed? Shot in NYC, Oakland, and Cincinnati, this short explores the state of the #OWS protests now that local governments have removed permanent encampments, and asks what the future will be for this still-young nationwide movement.

Produced and edited by Chase Whiteside (interviews), Erick Stoll (camera), and Liz Cambron.

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carton-rouge:

Occupy Wall Street makes bid for new New York City camp

Occupy protesters played drums, cymbals and  trombones, held group  meetings and waved signs with a variety of messages — “Disobedience is   civil” and “Sorry to inconvenience your apathy” — as they marked the  movement’s third-month anniversary with a major direct action that could  give them a new home as authorities continue to shutter camps  nationwide. 
A few hundred protesters — flanked by police  officers — coalesced on a nearly half-acre plot about one mile  northwest of their former camp at Zuccotti Park. But their potential new  landlord at Duarte Square, Trinity Church, has voiced strong  opposition, and the move by Occupy is seen by some as applying strong  pressure to them to cave in and let the protesters install themselves.
Under  the banner of “Re-Occupy,” the protesters said more than 1,400 people  — elders of the civil rights movement, prominent artists, faith leaders  and community members — will help them try and set up camp there after  they were evicted from Zuccotti Park on Nov. 15.
“I’m just loving  seeing everybody from Zuccotti Park and it really puts an exclamation  point on the (question) that’s been asked today so many times, ‘Do you  guys need a space?’ … and the answer is, ‘yes.’ When you walk around  and see the familiar faces and the kindred spirits and the unification  of effort, then you realize yes we do need a space so that we can all be  together and function as whole as a group and move forward, no doubt,”  said Thorin Caristo, a 37-year-old protester who is part of an  independent livestream team.

carton-rouge:

Occupy Wall Street makes bid for new New York City camp

Occupy protesters played drums, cymbals and trombones, held group meetings and waved signs with a variety of messages — “Disobedience is civil” and “Sorry to inconvenience your apathy” — as they marked the movement’s third-month anniversary with a major direct action that could give them a new home as authorities continue to shutter camps nationwide. 

A few hundred protesters — flanked by police officers — coalesced on a nearly half-acre plot about one mile northwest of their former camp at Zuccotti Park. But their potential new landlord at Duarte Square, Trinity Church, has voiced strong opposition, and the move by Occupy is seen by some as applying strong pressure to them to cave in and let the protesters install themselves.

Under the banner of “Re-Occupy,” the protesters said more than 1,400 people — elders of the civil rights movement, prominent artists, faith leaders and community members — will help them try and set up camp there after they were evicted from Zuccotti Park on Nov. 15.

“I’m just loving seeing everybody from Zuccotti Park and it really puts an exclamation point on the (question) that’s been asked today so many times, ‘Do you guys need a space?’ … and the answer is, ‘yes.’ When you walk around and see the familiar faces and the kindred spirits and the unification of effort, then you realize yes we do need a space so that we can all be together and function as whole as a group and move forward, no doubt,” said Thorin Caristo, a 37-year-old protester who is part of an independent livestream team.

the merger of state and corporate power

carton-rouge:

> local PUBLIC law enforcement agencies distribute flyer on ‘domestic threats,’ to protect corrupt businesses from criticism

> local PUBLIC law enforcement agencies include in said flyer a warning that protesters might try to record and embarrass them (as if this is the police’s business)

> local PUBLIC law enforcement agencies denounce the ‘anti-capitalist profile’

The police are not the 99%. They are the armed watchdogs of privilege and convenience for the corporate and financial class. They are here to protect an ideology, and they freely acknowledge that in the flyer obtained by Occupy London.

timemagazine:

TIME’s 2011 Person of the Year is The Protester

timemagazine:

TIME’s 2011 Person of the Year is The Protester

socialismartnature:

“Occupy” protesters on the West Coast moved Monday to disrupt ports in Los Angeles, San Francisco and elsewhere.

The “Wall Street on the Waterfront” protests seem to have had more success in Oakland [than elsewhere]. KQED says that a crowd their reporter estimated to be 1,000 strong marched through the streets of West Oakland this morning. At the port, protesters were able to disrupt operations:

Caitlin Esch, who is at the port now, says at least three of the six gates at the port are effectively blocked, with nothing moving in or out as protesters clog up the entrances. Trucks are lined up, some trying to drop off, some trying to pick up.

Other ports targeted by Occupy protesters today include San Diego; Seattle, Tacoma, Washington, and Anchorage, Alaska.

Up to 50,000 people braved the cold and snow on Saturday to turn out for the largest ever protest against the rule of prime minister Vladimir Putin.

Bolotnaya Square, across the river from the Kremlin in central Moscow, was filled to overflowing with thousands standing shoulder-to-shoulder on the bridges and along the riverfront leading to the site. Tens of thousands of police and interior troops were deployed around the area, but protesters had been allowed by officials to gather in an unprecedented show of discontent.

Shouts of “Russia without Putin!” and “Freedom!” were mixed with demands that the Kremlin annul a disputed parliamentary election that saw Putin’s United Russia party gain nearly 50% of the vote despite widespread accusations of fraud.

"I demand new elections," said Maxim, 26, an economist. "If they don’t agree, we will continue to come out. The people have woken up – they see there’s a point to going out into the streets and expressing what they don’t agree with."

Opposition leader Vladimir Ryzhkov said a further protest would be held on Christmas eve if the Kremlin refused to cancel the election results. The overwhelmingly young crowd organised via social networking sites and exceeded early estimates of 30,000.

Activists at Occupy Wall Street have issued a call to thousands of protesters across the US to reoccupy outdoor public spaces to mark the movement’s three-month anniversary.

The Occupy movement has stalled in recent weeks after a wave of evictions swept away a raft of encampments, including the largest in Los Angeles, Philadelphia and New York. On Wednesday, it suffered a fresh blow as police in riot gear cleared Occupy San Francisco camp on the orders of the mayor, who had been sympathetic to protesters, while Occupy Boston lost legal protection against eviction.

Organisers said they hoped the call to reoccupy on the 17 December would galvanise and grow the movement.

Amin Husain, a press spokesman for OWS, said: “We know that occupation empowers people and eliminates fear. It permits individuals to assert themselves as political beings even although the system doesn’t represent them.” […]

In a piece published this week in the first issue of Tidal, a magazine published by the Occupy movement, Judith Butler, academic and feminist theorist at the University of California, Berkeley, spoke of its importance.

Butler said: “When bodies gather together as they do to express their indignation and to enact their plural existence in public space, they are also making broader demands. They are demanding to be recognised and to be valued; they are exercising a right to appear and to exercise freedom; they are calling for a liveable life.

"These values are presupposed by particular demands, but they also demand a more fundamental restructuring of our socio-economic and political order."