#occupywallstreet
WARNING! The Official site http://occupywallst.org does not have an “official demand list” on the front page. This is a BOGUS “List of Demands From Occupywallstreet” Posting that was Reblogged by a Tumblr #politics Editor.
wespeakfortheearth:

TrendsMap Proves Scary Twitter Censorship Of #OccupyWallStreet From Trending Topics
A Trends map of trending twitter hashtags shows #OccupyWallStreet tweets surging in nations around the entire world, except in the United States, while Google Trends shows a corporate media blackout.
JP Morgan has invested $400 million dollars into twitter and in return [See image above].
Yet when the Freedom of Information Act Request is submitted to explain this, we will find the Feds ordered it to be censored due to national security, hence covering up Wall Street bankers commanding twitter to censor the hashtag.
Then, shortly after this article received a lot of attention, it comes back on the world map but still not allowed to be shown on the right hand side of trends.

wespeakfortheearth:

TrendsMap Proves Scary Twitter Censorship Of #OccupyWallStreet From Trending Topics

A Trends map of trending twitter hashtags shows #OccupyWallStreet tweets surging in nations around the entire world, except in the United States, while Google Trends shows a corporate media blackout.

JP Morgan has invested $400 million dollars into twitter and in return [See image above].

Yet when the Freedom of Information Act Request is submitted to explain this, we will find the Feds ordered it to be censored due to national security, hence covering up Wall Street bankers commanding twitter to censor the hashtag.

Then, shortly after this article received a lot of attention, it comes back on the world map but still not allowed to be shown on the right hand side of trends.

socialismartnature:

Nurses Call for Tax on Wall Street to Heal America

Nurses, who every day care for the casualties of the economic crisis driven by Wall Street greed, plan to hold a rally in Dewey Square at the site of the Occupy Boston Protest, to show their support for the movement and to highlight the MNA/NNU’s “Main Street Contract” campaign for a tax on Wall Street financial speculation to provide revenue for Main Street reforms, including jobs at living wages, quality education, guaranteed health care for all, and freedom from hunger, homelessness, and retirement insecurity. 

The action is part of the opening day activities of the Massachusetts Nurses Association/National Nurses United 2011 Convention (Oct. 5 – 7), being held at the Boston Marriott in Newton.  Hundreds of nurses from all corners of the Commonwealth will board buses at the event and head to the rally at 3 p.m.

What:   Nurses Rally to Support Occupy Boston

When:  Wednesday, Oct. 5, 2011 at 3 p.m.

Where:  Site of Protest in Dewey Square, Outside South Station

socialismartnature:

I’m pretty sure this exchange at today’s briefing with Jay Carney represents the first time the White House has been asked to weigh in on the Occupy Wall Street protests — yet another sign of the movement’s astonishing growth in recent days:

QUESTION: Have the “Occupy Wall Street” protests reached a level of the President’s engaged awareness? Is he sympathizing with the protestors? Is he concerned about the protests at all?
CARNEY: I haven’t discussed it with him. I’m sure he’s aware of it because he follows the news. I would simply say that, to the extent that people are frustrated with the economic situation, we understand. And that’s why we’re so urgently trying to focus Congress’s attention on the need to take action on the economy and job creation.
And as regards Wall Street, I mean, one of the things that this President is very proud of is the consumer protections that were put into place through legislation that Republicans are now eager to try to dismantle. We think that’s a bad idea…Because these are common-sense consumer protections that would prevent the kind of abuse that credit card companies engaged in against credit card holders, that would protect against some of the actions that were taken that led to, or contributed to, the financial crisis that we saw in 2008. These were measures that the President felt were very important, and there’s a clear effort within the Congress to prevent the full implementation of legislation by holding up this nomination. We think that’s cynical and a bad idea.

The story here is not what the White House said but that it was asked to weigh in on the protests at all — another sign of the remarkable speed with which it has grown from a crowd chanting at police two weeks ago.

 … If there’s one thing that’s growing clearer by the hour, it’s that this is an entirely organic effort, one that’s about nobody but the protesors themselves. In this sense, we’re seeing a replay of the Wisconsin protests. Those ended up falling just short of what activists had hoped to achieve, but their months-long showing was still important — it demonstrated that left wing populism is still alive and well and sent an important message about the mood of the country.

If their first reaction to it is to hawk their lacklustre (and almost insulting) ‘Wall Street Reform’ attempts, then they really don’t ‘understand.’

cwnl:

wespeakfortheearth:

“New York City Police Foundation — New York JPMorgan Chase recently donated an unprecedented $4.6 million to the New York City Police Foundation. The gift was the largest in the history of the foundation and will enable the New York City Police Department to strengthen security in the Big Apple. The money will pay for 1,000 new patrol car laptops, as well as security monitoring software in the NYPD’s main data center.

New York City Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly sent CEO and Chairman Jamie Dimon a note expressing “profound gratitude” for the company’s donation.

“These officers put their lives on the line every day to keep us safe,” Dimon said. “We’re incredibly proud to help them build this program and let them know how much we value their hard work.”

Oh how the pieces fall together :) like a symphony.

This afternoon’s #OCCUPYWALLSTREET march has drawn thousands of people, by most accounts being the most well-attended march yet. They have shut down the Brooklyn Bridge to traffic as they march across its lanes. This came after an earlier march by the United Way and anti-poverty activists, which also shut down the bridge.
More photos:

This afternoon’s #OCCUPYWALLSTREET march has drawn thousands of people, by most accounts being the most well-attended march yet. They have shut down the Brooklyn Bridge to traffic as they march across its lanes. This came after an earlier march by the United Way and anti-poverty activists, which also shut down the bridge.

More photos:

We’re talking about a democratic awakening. We’re talking about raising political consciousness, so it spills over; all parts of the country so people can begin to see what’s going on through a different set of lens. And then you begin to highlight what the more detailed demands would be, because in the end we’re really talking about what Martin King would call a revolution; a transfer of power from oligarchs to every day people of all colors, and that is a step-by-step process. It’s a democratic process, it’s a non-violent process, but it is a revolution, because these oligarchs have been transferring wealth from poor and working people at a very intense rate in the last 30 years, and getting away with it, and then still smiling in our faces and telling us it’s our fault. That’s a lie, and this beautiful group is a testimony to that being a lie.

When you get the makings of a U.S. autumn responding to the Arab Spring, and is growing and growing—-I hope it spills over to San Francisco and Chicago and Miami and Phoenix, Arizona, with our brown brothers and sisters, hits our poor white brothers and sisters in Appalachia—-so. it begins to coalesce. And I tell you, it is sublime to see all the different colors, all the different genders, all the different sexual orientations and different cultures, all together here in Liberty Plaza; there’s no doubt about it.

Cornel West, interview. Democracy Now!, 29 September 2011

A good response to people who keep demanding that the OWS protestors draw up some sort of platform of demands. That rarely happens in the early stages of liberation movements. At the moment, it’s about raising the consciousness of everyday Americans who have thus far accepted the notion that the U.S. is a democratic, fair, and equal society. It may be a strange notion to most Americans, but our country is one that—like the countries involved in the Arab Spring—is crying out for a democratic revolution.

(via downlo)

wespeakfortheearth:

Man and his son handing out water and sandwiches to protesters.

<3

wespeakfortheearth:

Man and his son handing out water and sandwiches to protesters.

<3

sarahlee310:

09-29-11 Sen. Bernie Sanders became the first US Senator to voice his support for Occupy Wall Street on Countdown With Keith Olbermann.

When we first arrived on the scene, protesters were marching along the sidewalk in unison, chanting. There was no sense of chaos. Many held video and audio recording devices, including camera phones.

However, the stream of protesters did disrupt traffic. Pedestrians wove in and out of the mass of protesters, some on their way to do Saturday errands, others who joined in for a block or two, chanting with the masses.

As more people spilled into the street, police started to demand that protesters stay on the sidewalk. But as people seemed to be retreating from harm’s way, police began pushing the protesters. I saw police use large nets to corral people en masse. I watched as police pepper sprayed several young women in the face. (An NYPD spokesperson confirmed the use of pepper spray to MetroFocus.) I saw senior citizens and teenagers get arrested. I saw about 20 or 30 police officers tackle people and prod them roughly with police batons…

When I saw the young women get pepper sprayed, I ran over to interview them. While holding a microphone and wearing a badge identifying myself as an employee of “WNET – New York Public Media,” I found myself suddenly roped into one of the large nets. I was thrown against a wall and handcuffed with hard plastic zip-tie restraints. I sat kneeling on the sidewalk with about 50 others. I yelled over and over “I’m press! I’m with WNET MetroFocus! Please do not arrest me.”